The Center For Ocean Solutions Research
April 2018

Stanford researchers find that swarms of tiny organisms mix nutrients in ocean waters

John Dabiri, Stephen Monosmith, Jeff Koseff and graduate students have studied how brine shrimp move in the lab to better understand the impact plankton and organisms like krill have on ocean waters. It turns out, when tiny organisms move en masse, they churn the water more than expected and might be critical to ocean dynamics.
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News

May 26, 2011

Experts Create First Legal Roadmap to Tackle Local Ocean Acidification Hotspots

News Source: California Coastkeeper Alliance.  Ocean acidification, associated with global greenhouse gas emissions, is also caused by coastal pollution and other local sources that can be managed under existing laws, according to a research team led by the Center for Ocean Solutions.

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News

May 26, 2011

Send In The Lawyers: Experts Create First Legal Roadmap To Tackle Local Ocean Acidification Hotspots

News Source: Underwater Times.  Coastal communities hard hit by ocean acidification hotspots have more options than they may realize, says an interdisciplinary team of science and legal experts from Stanford's Center for Ocean Solutions.

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News

May 26, 2011

Experts Create First Legal Roadmap to Tackle Local Ocean Acidification Hotspots

News Source: RedOrbit.  In a paper published in the journal Science, experts from Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions and colleagues make the case that communities don't need to wait for a global solution to ocean acidification to fix a local problem that is compromising their marine environment.

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News

May 26, 2011

Experts Create First Legal Roadmap to Tackle Local Ocean Acidification 'Hotspots'

News Source: Stanford News Service.  Ocean acidification, usually associated with global greenhouse gas emissions, is also caused by coastal pollution and other local sources that can be managed under existing laws, according to a research team led by the Center for Ocean Solutions.

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