The Center For Ocean Solutions Research
April 2018

Stanford researchers find that swarms of tiny organisms mix nutrients in ocean waters

John Dabiri, Stephen Monosmith, Jeff Koseff and graduate students have studied how brine shrimp move in the lab to better understand the impact plankton and organisms like krill have on ocean waters. It turns out, when tiny organisms move en masse, they churn the water more than expected and might be critical to ocean dynamics.
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Type | Date

News

May 26, 2011

Experts Create First Legal Roadmap to Tackle Local Ocean Acidification Hotspots

News Source: PhysOrg.  In a paper published in the journal Science, experts from Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions and colleagues suggest that communities need not wait for a global solution to ocean acidification to fix a local problem that is compromising their marine environment.

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News

May 25, 2011

Experts Create First Legal Roadmap to Tackle Ocean Acidification ’Hotspots’

News Source: myScience.  Ocean acidification, usually associated with global greenhouse gas emissions, is also caused by coastal pollution and other local sources that can be managed under existing laws, according to a research team led by the Center for Ocean Solutions.

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News

May 3, 2011

"Small fry" fish just as vulnerable to population plunges as sharks and tuna, Stanford researchers say

News Source: Stanford News Service.  Stanford researchers Milan Pinsky and Dr. Stephen Palumbi discovered that sardines, anchovies and other small fishes are at an equal or greater risk of suffering a collapse as large fishes such as sharks and tuna.

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News

May 3, 2011

Overfishing Hits All Creatures Great and Small

News Source: Nature.com.  Stanford researchers Milan Pinsky and Dr. Stephen Palumbi discovered that small fishes such as anchovies and sardines are equally or even more vulnerable to population collapse as large fishes such as tuna and sharks.

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