The Center For Ocean Solutions Research
April 2018

Stanford researchers find that swarms of tiny organisms mix nutrients in ocean waters

John Dabiri, Stephen Monosmith, Jeff Koseff and graduate students have studied how brine shrimp move in the lab to better understand the impact plankton and organisms like krill have on ocean waters. It turns out, when tiny organisms move en masse, they churn the water more than expected and might be critical to ocean dynamics.
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Story

July 11, 2017

The Public Trust Doctrine: A Guiding Principle for Governing California's Coast Under Climate Change

California’s coastal bluffs may recede by as much 100 feet and extreme floods will become ever more common, according to recent studies. Communities are beginning to feel the pinch and coastal land managers are brainstorming how to address these extreme events and effects of California's dynamic coastline and sea level rise. To inform these efforts, a working group of coastal land use and public trust experts, convened by Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions, has published a "Consensus Statement on the Public Trust Doctrine, Sea Level Rise, and Coastal Land Use in California."

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Story

June 26, 2017

Of Blues Riffs and Blue Reefs

Marine biology and music encounter the legacy of atomic bombs at Bikini Atoll

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Story

June 15, 2017

Q&A with Fiorenza Micheli: Monitoring human rights in the seafood sector

A group of scientists, including Stanford professor Fiorrenza Micheli, has urged marine scientists to focus attention on human rights violations and other social issues in the seafood sector, in addition to advocating for sustainable practices.

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Story

June 15, 2017

DNA left by ocean animals provides rare glimpse of marine ecosystems, Stanford researchers say

As ocean animals swim past, they leave behind DNA in shed cells, tissues, scales and feces. Now, scientists have shown these genetic clues can be used as forensic markers to accurately and easily survey marine life in complex deep-water environments.

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