Specialties:

At the Center for Ocean Solutions, Dr. Steven Bograd is a member of the “Climate Change and Pelagic Predators” and “Patterns, Drivers and Consequences of Coastal Hypoxia in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem” Working Groups. His research is focused on physical-biological interactions, eastern boundary current systems, climate variability, marine biologging, and fisheries oceanography. He is currently involved in a number of research projects studying climate variability and its impacts on the marine ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean.  Steven was co-Principal Investigator of the Census of Marine Life’s Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP) program, and is currently an Associate Editor at Fisheries Oceanography and an Academic Editor at PloS ONE. Steven received his PhD in Oceanography from the University of British Columbia in 1998, and held a post-doctoral fellowship at Scripps Institution of Oceanography before coming to NOAA in 2001.

Contact information:
Email: Steven.Bograd@noaa.gov
Phone: (831) 648-8314
Website: http://swfsc.noaa.gov/staff.aspx

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Featured climate change literature covers topics that include:

-Coastal climate adaptation planning

-Ocean acidification

-Marine protected area monitoring

-Climate change and top predators

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Specialties:

Professor Monismith's research and teaching in environmental and geophysical fluid dynamics involves the application of fluid mechanics principles to the analysis of flow processes operating in lakes, estuaries and the oceans.  His current research includes studies of mixing and circulation in tropical lakes, estuarine hydrodynamics, flows over coral reefs at scales from individual colonies to whole reefs, nearshore flow processes in the coastal ocean, turbulence in density stratified flows, and physical-biological interactions in phytoplankton and benthic systems. 

Because his interest in estuarine processes is intertwined with an interest in California water policy issues, he has participated in various efforts to develop management strategies for improving the "health" of San Francisco Bay, and is currently the chair of the Interagency Ecological Program Science Advisory Group.  Since 1996, has been Director of the Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Stanford.  He was a resident fellow at Robinson House (Stanford's environment theme house) and was a 1989 recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator award. Prior to coming to Stanford, he spent three years in Perth, Australia as a research fellow at the University of Western Australia.  A Bay Area native, Professor Monismith received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Contact Information:
Email: monismith@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-4764
Website: http://www-ce.stanford.edu/faculty/monismith/

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Ryan Kelly is an affiliated researcher with Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions and an assistant professor in the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs at the University of Washington.  Ryan's role is to bridge the divide between hard scientific data and policymakers' use of those data, bringing both technical and legal analysis to bear on issues affecting the coastal ocean.  Ryan received a Ph.D. in ecology, evolution and environmental biology from Columbia University, followed by two years of postdoctoral work at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station, using molecular techniques to study the interplay among geography, ecology and genetics in Pacific intertidal animals.  He later received a J.D. from University of California, Berkeley’s Boalt Hall, applying genetic and ecological research to real-world questions of law and policy.  His current work focuses on ocean acidification, environmental monitoring and public resources management.

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Robert "Bob" Richmond is the director of the University of Hawai`i at Manoa's Kewalo Marine Marine Laboratory. He also serves as a professor and a Pew Fellow in marine conservation. Richmond works to strike a balance between basic and applied research. He uses research results to inform the management and preservation of tropical marine ecosystems and marine biodiversity.  He is also the former President of the International Society for Reef Studies, the Science Advisor to the All-Islands Committee of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, a science advisor for the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative and a member of the Science and Policy Advisory Committee for the Palau International Coral Reef Center.  He received awards from the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force in 2003 for “Outstanding Scientific Advancement of Knowledge” and in 2014 for his scientific mentoring and support for communities on coral reef issues. Richmond recieved an Aldo Leopold Fellowship in Environmental Leadership in 2004 and a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation in 2006.  He works closely with community-based organizations, elected and traditional leaders, and stakeholders. He has trained over 60 Pacific Islanders in his laboratory over the years.  Richmond has been the P.I. or Co-P.I. on over $18 million in research grants from NSF, NIH and NOAA. He also served as Director of the University of Guam Marine Laboratory from 1989 - 1991.

His research interests include coral reef ecology, marine conservation biology, ecotoxicology, bridging science to management and policy, and the integration of traditional ecological knowledge with modern approaches to resource use and protection. His childhood fascination with “Dr. Doolittle” helped inspire his approach to studying coral reefs by “listening” to corals and other reef creatures through the use of ecological indicators and molecular biomarkers.

Richmond received a B.S. in Biology/Geology with High Distinction from the University of Rochester in 1976, an M.S. in Marine Environmental Sciences from the Marine Sciences Research Center, SUNY at Stony Brook, in 1982, a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the Dept. of Ecology and Evolution, SUNY at Stony Brook in 1983 and a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama.  Since then, he has spent most of his professional career studying coral reef ecosystems in both the Caribbean and the Pacific, including the Virgin Islands, the Grenadines, the Galapagos Islands, Hawaii, Japan and throughout Micronesia. 

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Prior to joining MBARI in 1991, Peter Brewer spent 24 years as a researcher at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, rising to the rank of Senior Scientist. He served as Program Manager for Ocean Chemistry at the National Science Foundation 1981-1983, receiving the NSF Sustained Superior Performance Award. He has taken part in more than 30 deep-sea cruises, and has served as Chief Scientist on major expeditions and on more than 90 Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives with MBARI ships and vehicles. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Internationally he has served as a member of SCOR, and as Vice-Chair of JGOFS. He has served as a member of Vice-President Gore's Environmental Task Force, and as a member of MEDEA. He served as President of the Ocean Sciences Section of AGU from 1994-1996. He served as a lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on carbon capture and storage.

At MBARI he served as President and Chief Executive Officer from 1991-1996, completing major laboratory and SWATH ship construction programs and doubling the size of the Institution, before returning to full time research. His research interests are broad and include the ocean geochemistry of the greenhouse gases. He has devised novel techniques both for measurement and for extracting the oceanic signatures of global change. At MBARI his current interests include the geochemistry of gas hydrates, and the evolution of the oceanic fossil fuel CO2 signal. He has developed novel techniques for deep ocean laser Raman spectroscopy, and for testing the principles and impacts of deep ocean CO2 injection. He is author or co-author of more than 150 scientific papers and editor of several books.

Contact information:
Email: brpe@mbari.org
Phone: (831) 775-1706
Website: http://www.mbari.org/staff/brpe/

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 Matson’s lab at Stanford University carries out research in several different areas:

1)  Biogeochemical and ecological processes in forest and agricultural systems. Over the past several decades, their research has focused on the effects of land use change and other human caused changes on biogeochemical processes and trace gas exchanges in tropical environments. Their work has ranged from measuring trace gas emissions and developing an ecologically based global budget for the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide to analyzing the consequences of nitrogen deposition for biogeochemical processes in tropic forests.

2)  Sustainable agriculture.  In fifteen years, their research has focused primarily on agricultural and other land use issues in the Yaqui Basin, Sonora, Mexico. With their collaborators, including hydrologists, geographers, economists and agronomists, they have carried out interdisciplinary studies of intensive agricultural fertilization, water use, aquaculture development, and other land use changes in the tightly linked land-coast-sea system. Their goals are to understand the processes that control such land use decisions and their consequences, and to develop tools and approaches that allow managers to make sustainable choices in development and resource use across the entire Valley. 
Research in the Yaqui Valley has dove-tailed with writing and policy work on issues of sustainability. Matson has been a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Sustainable Development and the founding chair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability.

3)  Land-sea Interactions.  Using the Yaqui Valley as a focal point, members of their lab have evaluated the transfers of nutrients from fertilized agriculture to freshwater and marine ecosystems, identifying the critical importance of land use on marine processes at regional scales.

4)  Vulnerability Analyses and Metrics.  Different human-environment systems respond differentially to the influence of climate changes, policy changes and other interacting factors; some are more likely to suffer harm than are others.  Their research team has focused on developing frameworks for vulnerability analyses in agricultural and coastal environments, and in developing metrics that allow identification of those areas most vulnerable.

Contact Information:
Email: matson@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-2750
Website: http://pangea.stanford.edu/research/matsonlab/members/Matson.htm

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Climate change is expected to have unprecedented impacts on our ocean and coastal systems.The Center works on issues associated with:

  • Sea level rise
  • Ocean acidification
  • Ecosystem shifts
  • Ocean Hypoxia

 

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